Motivational Programs

MOTIVATIONAL PROGRAMS – ARE THEY BENEFICIAL:

Everyone generally comes across a phase in one’s career, where he/she has to attend a number of self-improvement programs/ motivational sessions etc (not referring to hardcore training programs). The benefit derived from these programs seems to vary from individual to individual. We generally observe that after attending such programs, one is greatly inspired and vows to implement whatever is learnt to the full extent. Over a period of time one only remembers a small portion of  what one has learnt in such programs or at least is unable to put it to much use. Has anyone wondered why this happens?

A short hypothesis is placed below for discussion on the extent of benefits derived from such programs:

If Benefit from a program is defined as P(T), then P(T) = pgri (X) T.

Where p is the pass-on factor             <1,

g is the grasp factor                            <1,

r is the retention factor                        <1,

and      i is the implementation factor  <1

T is total content to be grasped.

The product ‘ pgri’ will be less than 1

A brief explanation:

The Motivational speaker – an expert in the subject- is likely to have  limitations (with due respect) and he/ she can only pass on only a certain percentage of what he/she knows (which itself is generally not 100%!) and this factor can be defined as ‘p’.

The participant during the session can grasp only a certain percentage of what is presented and this varies with individual and this factor can be defined as ‘g’.

After the session is over and by the time he/she gets an opportunity to implement what is learnt, he/she may retain only a certain percentage of what is grasped during the session and this factor can be defined as ‘r’.

Even from what is retained, one may be able to implement only a certain percentage of it due to various factors and this can be defined as ‘i’.

So the real benefit works out only to be a fraction of the total content T. It may be a bit subjective and a little difficult to arrive at values for p,g,r,i. The success of a program can be gauged from the value achieved for this product; the higher the value the more beneficial the program. And surely for values below a certain figure, one can infer that the program was not successful!

Out of the total participants, who attend any program, generally only a small percentage of them may be in a position to benefit from it- pgri sufficiently high!

Advertisements